Course Browser

Search and explore Duke Law's wide variety of courses that comprise near every area of legal theory and practice. Contact the Director of Academic Advising to confirm whether a course satisfies a graduation requirement in any particular semester. Course evaluations can be found here.
 

NOTE: Course offerings change. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.

 

Credits
Semester
JD Course of Study
JD/LLM in International & Comparative Law
JD/LLM in Law & Entrepreneurship
International LLM - 1 year
LLM in Law & Entrepreneurship - 1 year
Certificate in Public interest and Public Service Law
 
Clear all filters32 courses found.
Course Number Course Title Course Credits Degree Requirements Semesters Taught Methods of Evaluation

101

Foundations of Law 1
  • JD 1L
  1. Fall 17
  2. Fall 18
  3. Spring 20
  • Final Exam

This year-long, signature course exposes all first year students to foundational legal concepts, themes and issues in the study of law. This is a one credit course.

242W

Social Justice Lawyering, Writing Credit 1
  • JD SRWP
  • JD elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM writing
  • PIPS elective
  1. Fall 19
  2. Fall 17
  3. Fall 18
  • Research paper, 25+ pages

While enrolled in Law 242 Social Justice Lawyering, with prior professor approval, students may submit a 30-page research paper and earn an additional one credit for the course.  This paper is in addition to all the other course requirements, including the five written assignments, but may be related to your case study presentation. 

The paper may be used to satisfy the upper level writing requirement, the LLM writing requirement, and/or the JD/LLM writing requirement.  You must meet with Professor Berlin or Gordon by September 1, 2017, which is the last day of the drop-add period, if you would like to seek an additional credit and if you plan to use your paper to satisfy one or more of these requirements.

244

The Business and Economics of Law Firms 1
  • JD elective
  • IntlLLM NY Bar
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Fall 19
  2. Fall 17
  3. Fall 18
  • Reflective Writing
  • Group project(s)
  • Practical exercises
  • Class participation

This course will provide students with an enhanced and vital understanding of law firms as business entities in a competitive and global market. Based on feedback from employers, interviews with hundreds of lawyers and published accounts from law firm leaders, it is clear that technical legal ability will be necessary but not sufficient to excel in the practice of law or any business endeavor in coming decades. The topics will be explored through the review and analysis of literature, statutes, and case studies, and will include a basic financial analysis of the operations of law firms. Assignments will be collaborative and will simulate the client advisory process allowing students to gain experience providing legal advice and business recommendations. Associate Dean and Senior Lecturing Fellows Bruce Elvin and George Krouse '70 will lead, teach and organize the seminar, with senior law and business leaders serving as guest lecturers many weeks.

318W

Comparative Constitutional Law, Writing 1
  • JD SRWP
  • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
  1. Fall 19
  • Research paper, 25+ pages

Students enrolled in Law318 Comparative Constitutional Law may choose to write a 25-30 page research paper, in lieu of the 10-12 page paper, in order to satisfy the JD Substantial Research and Writing Project degree requirement.  Students choosing this option should enroll in Law 318W.

328P

International Debt Finance Add-on Credit 1
  • JD elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Spring 18
  2. Spring 19
  3. Spring 20
  • Add on credit

Students have the option to complete a mid-semester assignment in Law 328 International Debt Finance for an additional credit. *LAW 328P MUST be added no later than 7th week of class.*

This course does not satisfy the JD Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

347S

Healthcare Law & Policy, Course Plus 1
  • JD elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  1. Fall 17
  2. Spring 19
  • Reflective Writing
  • Class participation

This seminar is available to students currently enrolled in Law 347 or who have taken it in a previous semester.  It is designed to supplement Health Law and similar graduate-level health policy offerings and will explore contemporary issues in health law and policy.  Topics to be considered will include:  Medicaid reform, competition policy, individual insurance markets, payment reform, provider strategy, and employee benefits design.  Some sessions will be organized around guest presentations from policymakers, policy thought leaders, and prominent academics.

371W

Products Liability, Writing Credit 1
  • JD SRWP
  • JD elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Spring 18
  • Research paper, 25+ pages

While enrolled in LAW 371 Products Liability, students may submit a 30+ page significant research paper which would be eligible for satisfaction of the JD-ULWR.

380

Research Methods in International, Foreign and Comparative Law 1
  • JD elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) required
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  1. Spring 18
  2. Spring 19
  3. Spring 20
  • Practical exercises
  • In-class exercise
  • Class participation
  • Other

This one-credit seminar in advanced legal research introduces students to specific sources and strategies for international, foreign, and comparative legal research. It covers key primary and secondary sources in both print and electronic formats, including freely available and subscription-based resources. The subjects examined include treaty law, the law of international organizations, European Union law, civil law and other foreign legal systems, as well as selected topics in international private law. The course emphasizes the research process, strategies, and evaluation of print and online sources in a changing information environment. This course is required for students enrolled in the J.D./LL.M. in Comparative and International Law and open to other students (2L and 3L) with the instructor's permission. The class will meet for eight 90-minute sessions. Grades will be based on in-class and take-home exercises, class participation, and a final research project.

425

Pretrial Criminal Litigation 1
  • JD elective
  • JD experiential
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  1. Fall 19
  2. Fall 17
  3. Fall 18
  • Oral presentation
  • Practical exercises
  • Class participation

This course will focus on the pretrial phase in criminal cases.  We will begin with a defendant’s initial appearance and conclude with a plea hearing.  Class discussions and readings will explore the pretrial practices of effective defense counsel, including conducting a defense investigation, working with experts, and managing clients.  The class will also emphasize oral advocacy skills, so students will be expected to appear as counsel during mock, in-class court hearings. It is anticipated that each class session will be divided into two components: (1) a short lecture/discussion period based on course readings and (2) skills practice.  Finally, this course will provide students with an opportunity to familiarize themselves with criminal case pleadings, including the drafting of at least one motion.  The course grade will be based on classroom participation, performance, and written work.  There is no final exam. 

465

Patent Claim Drafting and Foundations of Patent Strategy 1
  • JD elective
  • JD experiential
  • LLMLE (1 yr) elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntllLLM IP Cert
  1. Spring 19

Scope of patent protection is controlled by definitions of the invention known as patent claims. The role of intellectual property protection in the economy has caused attention to be given to the precision of claim drafting. Focus on skills used in patent claim writing across a variety of technical fields and developed through exercises, problems, and competitions. Discussions of client counseling and patent application drafting in conjunction with the skill-oriented sessions provide a background in the practical issues that control the approaches taken to claim writing, as well as a basis for discussion during particular problems. This course is especially useful for students interested in patent preparation, prosecution, and litigation, or corporate law involving intellectual property transaction.



Students are required to attend the first class in order to remain enrolled in it.

517W

Advanced Contracts, Writing Credit 1
  • JD SRWP
  • JD elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Spring 18
  2. Spring 19
  3. Spring 20
  • Research paper, 25+ pages

While enrolled in LAW 517 Advanced Contracts, students may submit a significant research paper which would be eligible for satisfaction of the JD-ULWR.  LAW 517W must be added no later than the 7th week of class.

527W

Access to Medicines Writing Credit 1
  • JD SRWP
  • JD elective
  • IntllLLM IP Cert
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  1. Spring 18
  • Add on credit

While enrolled in Law 527 Access to Medicines: Intellectual Property and Global Public Health, students have the option to take an additional 1 credit if they wish to write a 45 page paper. *LAW 527W MUST be added no later than 7th week of class.*

536

The Presidency and Criminal Investigations 1
  • JD SRWP with add-on credit
  • JD elective
  • PIPS elective
  1. Spring 18
  • Reflective Writing
  • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages
  • Class participation

Recent developments have brought to the fore a collection of legal issues, some novel and others dormant for many years, relating to the interaction of the criminal investigative process with the White House and the presidency.  The seminar will discuss the legal boundaries around the criminal justice process’s interaction with the White House, while exploring larger themes about the office of the presidency and the constitutional structure of the national government.  The course will be structured around six relatively stand-alone topics:  (1) Independent and special counsels and their interaction with congressional investigations; (2) The grand jury, immunity, the Fifth Amendment privilege, and perjury/obstruction of justice, as they relate to White House investigations; (3) Representing the president:  attorney-client privilege, the White House counsel, and the private defense bar; (4) Executive privilege and potential executive immunity from indictment, trial, conviction and/or sentence; (5) The pardon power; and (6) The law of impeachment.
Students will be expected to lead one class meeting discussion during the semester, and a total of 15 pages of writing will be required. Students may elect to write four response papers of approximately four pages each, or one longer paper at the end of the semester of at least 15 pages.  Students will receive feedback on both written expression and class participation. Students who plan significant research projects on related topics may register for a second credit, and this research project may be used to satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.

536W

The Presidency and Criminal Investigations, Writing 1
  • JD SRWP
  • JD elective
  • PIPS elective
  1. Spring 18
  • Research paper, 25+ pages

While enrolled in LAW 536 The Presidency and Criminal Investigations, students may submit a significant research paper and earn an additional one credit for the course. 

553

Empirical Research Methods in Law 1
  • JD elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  1. Fall 18
  • Final Exam, option
  • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages, option
  • In-class exercise

There are three major objectives for this course: (1) to provide you with a substantive understanding of empirical methods and an opportunity to learn the principals of these methods with hands-on experience with easy-to-use statistical software (e.g., Excel and Stata); (2) to develop skills to choose and work with experts, and the ability to develop and refute quantitative evidence; and (3) to develop the necessary skills for critical thinking and evaluation of empirical work in academic studies and expert witness reports.

The course will be divided into three major components. The first section of the course will introduce a broad range of topics in methodology, from study design and hypothesis testing to descriptive statistics and multivariate regression techniques in the context of legal issues faced by practicing attorneys. The second section will include a series of lectures by judges and empirical scholars with a wealth of experience working with and as expert witnesses. The final section of the course will utilize this new knowledge and training to critically evaluate empirical scholarship and expert reports. Together, these course components will provide you with a comprehensive background in empirical methods and will prepare you for sophisticated and critical consumption of statistical analyses. The course also will equip those of you who are interested in pursuing academia with a foundation in quantitative research to produce empirical scholarship.

Participation during class is strongly encouraged, and computers are allowed in the classroom. Course grades will be based on class participation (10%), hands-on exercises (10%), and a discussion paper (80%).  For the paper, you will be asked to evaluate an Expert Report and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the study based on the research methods covered in this course. You have the option to take an in-class exam as a substitute for the paper.

 

572

Enterprise Law in Japan and the United States 1
  • JD elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • LLMWriting option with additional credit
  • IntlLLM writing, option
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Spring 20
  • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages
  • Class participation

This is a seminar course focusing on a comparative analysis of business systems in Japan and the United States. We will discuss the basic question: how does law matter to business practice? 

To answer this question, we need to take into consideration two complementarities. First, the legal system in a given country consists of a variety of legal subject areas, including corporate law, securities regulation, labor law, bankruptcy law, and tax law, among others. These areas of law do not operate in isolation but rather in complement to affect the business practices in a country. Second, the law operates in conjunction with economic markets and social norms. 

We will consider the firm as a forum for incentive bargaining among four major participants: management, employees, creditors, and shareholders. How do the complementary effects of various laws, markets and norms affect the incentives of each participant? How has this affected the accepted business practices in a country, and in turn, the broader business system? 

Students will be exposed to classical readings in business law theory, as well as more recent scholarship that applies those classical theories to case studies of modern US and Japanese firms. Through the readings and participation in class discussions, students will learn to think critically about the dynamic interplay of legal systems, economic markets, and social norms and their combined effects on business systems.

574

Lying and The Law of Questioning 1
  • JD SRWP with add-on credit
  • JD elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM writing, option
  1. Spring 20
  2. Spring 19
  • Reflective Writing
  • Class participation

This seminar will address the way in which legal institutions define and detect dishonesty. We will first discuss what is sometimes called “post-truth” discourse and the seeming suspension of fact-finding and truth-seeking in public life. The criminal justice system is both a natural habitat for dishonesty and the place where achieving accuracy is most important. Accordingly, we will use the context of investigations and trials to explore some larger themes about establishing factual baselines despite intense conflict. Topics will include liability for dishonest statements in investigations and testimony, interrogation practices, the problem of false confessions, incentivized witnesses, character and credibility, cross examination, storytelling at trial, and lie detection in the laboratory, courtroom, and popular culture. Readings will be posted on line and will include excerpts from law review articles and scholarly books, works of social science, investigative reporting, documentary footage, editorial commentary, and popular culture. The one-credit class will meet roughly every other Wednesday during the spring semester. There will be short writing assignments, and students will receive feedback on both written expression and class participation. Students who plan significant research projects on related topics may register for a second credit.

574W

Lying and The Law of Questioning, Writing Credit 1
  • JD SRWP
  • JD elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM writing, option
  1. Spring 20
  2. Spring 19
  • Add on credit

While enrolled in Law 574 Lying and the Law of Questioning, students who plan significant research projects on related topics may register for a second credit in order to satisfy the JD Writing Requirement. *LAW 574W must be added no later than 7th week of class.*

579W

Mass Torts Writing Credit 1
  • JD SRWP
  • JD elective
    • Add on credit

    While enrolled in Law 579 Mass Torts, students have the option to take an additional 1 credit if they wish to expand the required 15 page paper to 30 pages in order to satisfy the JD Writing Requirement. *LAW 579W MUST be added no later than 7th week of class.*

    591

    Development Finance 1
    • JD elective
    • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
    • LLMLE (1 yr) elective
    • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
    • IntlLLM Business Cert
    1. Fall 19
    2. Fall 17
    3. Fall 18
    • Reflective Writing
    • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages
    • Class participation

    The Course will provide a general overview of persisting development challenges in Low and Middle-Income Countries, and the shared global responsibility under the Agenda 2030 to address them. It will focus on the roles of and partnerships between various actors of development finance, such as government agencies, multilateral development banks, foundations, non-governmental organizations, and impact investors; and familiarize students with development finance instruments, such as budget aid, grants, loans, and blended finance mechanisms. The Course will also deal with critical views on Aid Effectiveness, and issues of Policy Coherence for Development in developed countries.

    Course Requirements:

    • Two 3-page essays: the first to be handed in on or before September 29, 2019, 11:59 p.m.; the second to be handed in on or before October 4, 2019, 11:59 p.m. (combined 30% of final grade)
    • One 10-page final paper to be handed in before December 13, 2019, 11:59 p.m. (40% of final grade);
    • Participation in class discussions (30% of final grade).

    609

    Readings: Introduction to Cyber Law and Policy 1
    • JD elective
    • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
    • IntllLLM IP Cert
    1. Fall 18
    2. Fall 19
    • Reflective Writing
    • Class participation

    This course will provide a brief introduction to the dynamic and rapidly evolving field of cyber law.  The course will be team-taught by multiple instructors over the course of ten weeks, and will consist of three major components:  (1) an overview of today’s threat landscape and the legal frameworks governing approaches to private sector data breaches, cybercrime by state and non-state actors, and cyberwarfare; (2) an exploration of key domestic and international data privacy laws, and the legal and policy issues surrounding the government’s collection of domestic and foreign data; and (3) the impact of emerging technologies on approaches to privacy and cybersecurity, with the financial sector as a case study.  The course will provide students with a foundation for addressing some of the most pressing legal and policy issues facing today’s lawyers, and will also serve as a gateway to more advanced cyber-related courses offered at Duke Law.

    611

    Readings 1
    • JD elective
    • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
    • IntlLLM Business Cert
    • PIPS elective
    1. Fall 17
    2. Spring 18
    3. Fall 18
    4. Spring 19
    5. Fall 19
    6. Spring 20
    • Reflective Writing
    • Class participation

    This discussion course focuses on readings that explore connections between the law, the practice of law, the legal system, and issues of current societal importance or interest. Each section of the course is expected to have a different specific focus and different readings.

    Readings courses focused on public interest may count towards the Public Interest and Public Service Certificate.

    612AB

    JD-LLM Readings: Current Issues in International and Comparative Law 1
    • LLM-ICL (JD) required
    1. Fall 18
    2. Spring 19
    • Reflective Writing
    • Class participation

    This one-credit year-long readings class will explore current issues in international and comparative law. Drawing on the expertise of Duke Law School’s international and comparative law faculty, the course will examine topics such as international law and populism, human rights and economic inequalities, and the future of multilateral institutions. This evening class will meet off campus six times throughout the year and will be offered on a credit/no-credit basis. It is open to JD.LLM students only. Response papers will be required. This class will be taught by Profs. Curt Bradley, Brewster, Helfer, Huckerby, Michaels, and Reichman.

    618

    Readings: Introduction to Health Law & Policy – What’s a Needle? and Other Foundational Questions 1
    • JD elective
    • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
    1. Fall 17
    2. Fall 18
    • Reflective Writing
    • Class participation

    This course offers a very broad yet brief introduction to the diverse and growing field of health law.  Team taught by six different instructors, this course designed both as a general overview to “everything you wanted to know about health law but were afraid to ask” as well as a gateway to Duke’s other offerings in health law and health policy.

    619

    Readings: Commercial Law and Society in Historical Perspective 1
    • JD elective
    • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
    1. Spring 20

    Fraud, mortgage crises, banking regulation, tax evasion – these are bywords of our time but, of course, such concepts and concerns have a long history. Many of the foundations of modern law regarding property and obligation were laid in English courts in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries –a period of remarkable commercial expansion, imperial overreach, and stock market plunges. How did developments in legal procedure and doctrine shape the course of socio-economic change in the modern age? And what kinds of impacts did commercialization and colonization have on English law in an era of expanding empire?

    Readings will explore such questions through study of the development of the Anglo-American law of contract, mortgage, bankruptcy and trust.  Readings will also include works on the history of colonialism, labor law, welfare, and slavery. In examining some exemplary cases and works of historical analysis, we will consider the different social, political, economic and cultural contexts within which seminal legal changes occurred.

    Requirements include class participation and completion of short response papers. 1 credit (graded on a credit/no credit basis). No exam or final paper, however students may, if they wish, receive 2 credits upon successful completion of an additional 15-page paper. Variable Credit.

    619W

    Readings: Commercial Law and Society in Historical Perspective, Add-On Credit 1
    • JD elective
    • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
    1. Spring 20
    • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages
    • Add on credit

    Students have the option to complete an additional 15-page paper in Law 619 Readings: Commercial Law and Society in Historical Perspective for an additional credit. *LAW 619W MUST be added no later than 7th week of class.*

    621S

    Externship Seminar 1
    • JD elective
    • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
    1. Fall 17
    2. Spring 18
    3. Fall 18
    4. Spring 19
    5. Fall 19
    6. Spring 20
    • Reflective Writing
    • Class participation
    • Other

    The externship seminar serves as the one-unit companion course for law students who are engaged in externships in the Triangle area.  Students will reflect on their placements, work on their communication skills, and deepen their understanding of professionalism through the classroom discussions and reflection papers.

    727

    Current Issues in Constitutional Interpretation 1
    • JD elective
    • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages

    This seminar will examine important constitutional issues that have arisen in recent Supreme Court cases and will use those cases as a vehicle for considering broader questions of constitutional interpretation and Supreme Court practice, such as theories of interpretation and the role of stare decisis. Among the issues that may be studied are the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms, the Sixth Amendment rights to counsel and trial by jury, the Eighth Amendment right to be free of cruel and unusual punishment, and the right to petition for a writ of habeas corpus.

    Enrollment for Current Issues in Constitutional Interpretation is limited to 15 students.  Only third-year students are eligible to apply for enrollment, as it is anticipated that students in their final year of law school will be best prepared to engage fully in the course.

    773

    Research Methods in Business Law 1
    • JD elective
    • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
    • IntlLLM Business Cert
    1. Spring 18
    2. Spring 19
    3. Spring 20
    • Practical exercises
    • In-class exercise
    • Class participation

    This one-credit seminar in advanced legal research will introduce students to specific sources and strategies for researching a variety of business law topics, including corporations, securities, and commercial bankruptcy and reorganization. We will cover key primary and secondary sources for business law research: state and federal cases, statutes, regulations, and other administrative materials; subject-specific secondary sources; company disclosure documents; and sources for factual company research, among others. The course will emphasize research process, strategies, and evaluation of print and online sources in a changing information environment. Students will develop their research skills through a variety of hands-on exercises. Grades will be based on in-class and take-home research exercises, class participation, and a final research project.

    Because this is a fast-track course, attendance at the first class session is mandatory.

    775

    Corporate Ethics 1
    • JD elective
    • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
    • IntlLLM Business Cert
    1. Fall 17
    2. Fall 18
    3. Fall 19
    • In-class exercise
    • Class participation

    This course is a one-credit seminar taught in two-hour blocks that focuses on the important role played by the corporate ethics office and its relationship with senior management and the board of directors of a corporation to ensure an ethical corporate culture. As we have learned through a series of corporate scandals starting with Enron and continuing through the events that contributed to the financial crisis of 2008, a review of today’s headlines would suggest that work remains to be done in many organizations to maintain an ethical corporate culture. This course will explore some of the critical factors behind the corporate scandals of the past, changes in the regulatory environment that address various aspects of those scandals, and the structure and scope of responsibility of today’s corporate ethics office as necessary to address these challenges. The course is designed to be highly interactive, and a number of in-class exercises will be assigned to assist students in becoming familiar with some of the dynamics faced by the corporate ethics office. The course will not have an exam.

    779

    Well-Being and the Practice of Law 1
    • JD elective
    • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
    1. Spring 18
    2. Spring 19
    3. Spring 20

    Optimistic, happy people outperform their counterparts on almost every measure of job success with the notable exception of one group: lawyers. Psychological research suggests that on the whole pessimists perform better in both law school and private practice. Since research also shows that pessimism can be a predictor of depression and/or lower levels of life satisfaction, this raises a question among academics who study well-being: what do we do about the lawyers? Or is the research insufficient to make such sweeping claims?

    This class will examine why the "pursuit of happiness," a phrase written by a lawyer, has proved futile for many members of the legal profession and those aspiring to its ranks.There is considerable data (that predates the current economic crisis) indicating that lawyers and law students suffer from greater rates of depression and anxiety than other professions, along with accompanying social maladies such as substance abuse. There is also considerable evidence of high career dissatisfaction among lawyers, and many others are leaving the profession or performing well below their capability. This seems unfathomable given the high levels of education, affluence, and respect lawyers enjoy (or will enjoy), factors which predict happiness and job satisfaction in other areas of life.
    This class will present the research to date on lawyers and happiness. We will examine the scientific data and academic literature on lawyer maladies, while examining holes in the collective wisdom and why the majority of lawyers are quite content. While acknowledging the very real problems of the profession, we will address the question many lawyers and law professors legitimately ask – so what: who said lawyers are supposed to be happy? We will then review simple actions law schools, bar associations, law firms, and individuals can take to improve the collective health of the profession, as well as the productivity and engagement of its individual practitioners. In the course of so doing, will learn the basic well-being measurement tools and practice interventions shown to increase individual happiness. This is a serious course grounded in the latest science; while there will be fairly intensive reading and writing requirements, they will be within the bounds of a one-credit hour course, and should add to the overall well-being of each student.

    825

    Practice and Strategic Development of International Transactions: Investment in Latin America 1
    • IntlLLM Business Cert
    • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
    1. Wintersession

    This course explores the fundamental issues, strategic considerations, and principles inherent in transnational business transactions in Latin America and the role of the international attorney in structuring and implementing such transactions. Class time is devoted to a case study of a merger and acquisition transaction involving the purchase of a Brazilian entity by a US multinational corporation. The process of constructing an "international deal" is analyzed step by step, exploring all phases of the venture. Focus is given to recognizing and anticipating potential areas of conflict and evaluating the appropriate and legally viable measures available to address these issues.