Course Browser

Search and explore Duke Law's wide variety of courses that comprise near every area of legal theory and practice. Contact the Director of Academic Advising to confirm whether a course satisfies a graduation requirement in any particular semester. Course evaluations can be found here.
 

NOTE: Course offerings change. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.

 

Credits
Semester
JD Course of Study
JD/LLM in International & Comparative Law
JD/LLM in Law & Entrepreneurship
International LLM - 1 year
LLM in Law & Entrepreneurship - 1 year
Certificate in Public interest and Public Service Law
 
Clear all filters12 courses found.
Course Number Course Title Course Credits Degree Requirements Semesters Taught Methods of Evaluation

312

Cybercrime 2
  • JD elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  • IntllLLM IP Cert
  • PIPS elective
  1. Spring 20
  • Reflective Writing
  • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages
  • Class participation

The course will survey the legal issues raised by cyber-related crime. The bulk of the course will be organized around two overarching themes: (1) substantive criminal law (i.e., the scope, structure, and limitations of the criminal laws that reach cyber-related crime); and (2) criminal procedure (i.e., the scope, structure, and limitations of the privacy laws and constitutional principles that regulate law enforcement investigations of cyber-related crime).  Along the way, we will also consider topics that frequently arise in cyber-related investigations and prosecutions, such as:  jurisdictional issues (e.g., federal/state dynamics and international cooperation in collecting evidence); national security considerations (e.g., state-sponsored intrusions and IP theft, terrorists’ use of the internet, government surveillance); and encryption.  We will make regular use of contemporary case studies, including several drawn from my own experience in the national security arena.  We will also examine threats that pose particularly difficult legal and policy challenges, such as foreign interference in U.S. elections and misinformation.

328

International Debt Finance (and Sovereign Debt Crises) 2
  • JD elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Spring 18
  2. Spring 19
  3. Spring 20

This course uses the lens of international debt finance to provide students with an advanced course in securities law, corporate law, and contract law. In the area of international debt finance, particular attention will be paid to debt issuances by sovereign nations. Given that much of this market is centered in New York and London, the focus of the course will be on U.S. and English law contracts and securities regulatory systems (including stock exchange listing regimes). Particular attention will be paid to how lawyers and their clients (both the sovereigns and the investment bankers) think about how to structure their contracts and what disclosures to make to the public regarding these contracts. Finally, attention will also be paid to the question of how domestic law private law principles can be utilized to solve or at least ameliorate the problem of third world debt (with particular reference to Sub Saharan debt).

Note: Students may enroll in 328P for an opportunity to earn an additional credit.

348

East Asian Law: Business & Finance Focus 2
  • JD elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Spring 18
  • Reflective Writing
  • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages
  • Class participation

This is a reading seminar, which will cover the East Asian law relating to the economic development, business practices, and financial regulation, exclusively focusing on Japan, Korea, and China. The legal system and economic development of these three countries have several features in common, if compared to the Western legal tradition, but the different history, culture, and politics of each country made its legal system distinctive to each other. This course aims to examine both these commonalities and distinctions, and thereby enhance our understanding of these three countries today. We will only cover the laws and practices relating to the corporate business and financial regulation, most of which have been inherited from the West. Such legal system has very little to do with the East Asian legal tradition. In most cases, it was previously based on the European Civil Law system, and recently more and more influenced by the Anglo-American laws and regulations. In this regard, the notions that have been often employed to explain the East Asian distinctions, such as Asian value, Confucianism, and traditional culture, will be rarely used or emphasized in this class. Rather, this course intends to examine how these three countries have struggled to incorporate the Western legal system—with or without its underlying assumptions and background social environments—into their society in a surprisingly limited time. To be sure, such transplant has not always been successful, and we can learn several lessons both from success and failure.

 

360

International Taxation 3
  • JD elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Spring 18
  2. Spring 19
  3. Spring 20
  • Final Exam

The course explores both the existing tax rules and the widespread policy concerns under discussion in the US and globally about current international tax law.

361

International Trade Law 3
  • JD elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Environ Cert
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Spring 18
  2. Spring 19
  3. Spring 20
  • Final Exam
  • Class participation

International trade and the World Trade Organization attract a lot of attention and debate. Why do almost all economists say that liberalizing trade flows is a good thing? Why do politicians – even ones who purportedly support free markets – often rail against import competition and "unfair trade"? How does trade liberalization interact with other public policy choices such as protecting the environment or promoting the economic development of poor countries? In this course, we will examine why the WTO exists, how it developed from the GATT and how it fits in the international economic order (Part I). The course will offer you an in-depth, practical knowledge of substantive WTO law drawing heavily on case law. It will address the basic principles of trade in goods and trade in services, as well as some of the more specialized WTO agreements on, for example on trade remedies (subsidies, anti-dumping and safeguards). From a more procedural side, the course will pay close attention to the unique WTO mechanism for the solution of global trade disputes, with special reference again to recent and ongoing cases (Part II). It will conclude by examining U.S. trade law – particularly the widely-used trade remedies laws – and assessing not only the practice of international trade law in the United States, but also whether these laws actually achieve their supposed policy objectives (Part III). Although this course will necessarily address key principles and theories undergirding the international trade law system, one of its driving themes will be the actual practice of this discipline in the United States and at the WTO. The course will be graded based on class participation and an open-book final exam.

535

Comparative Corporate Law 2
  • JD elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Fall 17
  • Reflective Writing
  • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages
  • Class participation

This is a reading seminar, which will be conducted by interactive class discussions, which will utilize heavily comparative approaches. We will start with the U.S. style corporate law theories and practices, and then discuss on how they are actually applied or rejected throughout the world, particularly in the United Kingdom, Continental Europe, and East Asia. The goal of this course is not merely to compare legal institutions of different legal origins. Rather, this course intends to consider several core problems with modern business association, and ask why and how different rules have been developed across the countries. There would be no clear answers, but such discussions will enhance our understanding of corporate law as well as capitalism in general. For these purpose, readings are carefully edited from three articles: roughly, one is associated with the United States, another with the Continental Europe (including the United Kingdom, if any), and the other with the East Asia (mostly Japan and Korea). Due to the time constraint, however, only a handful of core issues and selected papers will be assigned and discussed in class. More advanced theoretical issues on corporate governance will be covered by another corporate governance course. Instead, we will focus on controlling families and corporate group, different schemes of corporate monitoring (directors and institutional shareholders) across the countries, flexibility of corporate finance rules in terms of creditor protection, and finally, dramatic differences of takeover markets. Although the readings sometimes employed economic reasoning, the course requires only a basic understanding of microeconomics.

566A

Corporation and International Law: Past, Present, and Future 3
  • JD SRWP, option
  • JD elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) required
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Fall 17
  • Reflective Writing
  • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages
  • Class participation

From politics to popular culture, the corporation has become one of the most critical economic, political, and cultural institutions of the modern era.  It has also been one of the most controversial.  Are corporations people, societies, or even governments? Do they have rights? If so, what are their civic, social, ethical, and political responsibilities? If such questions are vexing within municipal and national contexts, they have been downright confounding for international legal regimes.  Corporations have a global footprint and influence on our conceptions of sovereignty and governance, the functioning of international markets, the nature of interstate relations, wealth distribution, international development, and, at a basic level, the lives of people around the world. Yet modern international law has generally been understood to apply almost exclusively to states and to touch only lightly on corporate institutions, with profound consequences for everything from human rights to the global environment. This course will address these questions and many others, both through our own readings and discussions, as well as frequent guest speakers, panels, and workshops, in conjunction with a year-long Mellon Foundation funded Sawyer Seminar.

A limited number of JD students may be permitted to use their paper to satisfy the JD upper-level writing requirement with prior approval of Professor Brewster.

566B

Corporation and International Law 3
  • JD SRWP
  • JD elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) required
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Spring 18
  • Reflective Writing
  • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages
  • Class participation

From politics to popular culture, the corporation has become one of the most critical economic, political, and cultural institutions of the modern era.  It has also been one of the most controversial.  Are corporations people, societies, or even governments? Do they have rights? If so, what are their civic, social, ethical, and political responsibilities? If such questions are vexing within municipal and national contexts, they have been downright confounding for international legal regimes.  Corporations have a global footprint and influence on our conceptions of sovereignty and governance, the functioning of international markets, the nature of interstate relations, wealth distribution, international development, and, at a basic level, the lives of people around the world. Yet modern international law has generally been understood to apply almost exclusively to states and to touch only lightly on corporate institutions, with profound consequences for everything from human rights to the global environment. This course will address these questions and many others, both through our own readings and discussions, as well as frequent guest speakers, panels, and workshops, in conjunction with a year-long Mellon Foundation funded Sawyer Seminar.

572

Enterprise Law in Japan and the United States 1
  • JD elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • LLMWriting option with additional credit
  • IntlLLM writing, option
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Spring 20
  • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages
  • Class participation

This is a seminar course focusing on a comparative analysis of business systems in Japan and the United States. We will discuss the basic question: how does law matter to business practice? 

To answer this question, we need to take into consideration two complementarities. First, the legal system in a given country consists of a variety of legal subject areas, including corporate law, securities regulation, labor law, bankruptcy law, and tax law, among others. These areas of law do not operate in isolation but rather in complement to affect the business practices in a country. Second, the law operates in conjunction with economic markets and social norms. 

We will consider the firm as a forum for incentive bargaining among four major participants: management, employees, creditors, and shareholders. How do the complementary effects of various laws, markets and norms affect the incentives of each participant? How has this affected the accepted business practices in a country, and in turn, the broader business system? 

Students will be exposed to classical readings in business law theory, as well as more recent scholarship that applies those classical theories to case studies of modern US and Japanese firms. Through the readings and participation in class discussions, students will learn to think critically about the dynamic interplay of legal systems, economic markets, and social norms and their combined effects on business systems.

591

Development Finance 1
  • JD elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
  • LLMLE (1 yr) elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Fall 19
  2. Fall 17
  3. Fall 18
  • Reflective Writing
  • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 10-15 pages
  • Class participation

The Course will provide a general overview of persisting development challenges in Low and Middle-Income Countries, and the shared global responsibility under the Agenda 2030 to address them. It will focus on the roles of and partnerships between various actors of development finance, such as government agencies, multilateral development banks, foundations, non-governmental organizations, and impact investors; and familiarize students with development finance instruments, such as budget aid, grants, loans, and blended finance mechanisms. The Course will also deal with critical views on Aid Effectiveness, and issues of Policy Coherence for Development in developed countries.

Course Requirements:

  • Two 3-page essays: the first to be handed in on or before September 29, 2019, 11:59 p.m.; the second to be handed in on or before October 4, 2019, 11:59 p.m. (combined 30% of final grade)
  • One 10-page final paper to be handed in before December 13, 2019, 11:59 p.m. (40% of final grade);
  • Participation in class discussions (30% of final grade).

722

International Business Law 3
  • JD elective
  • LLM-ICL (JD) elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Fall 17
  2. Fall 18
  3. Fall 19
  • Final Exam

The goal of this course is to provide students with a broad overview of how international rules shape global commerce. It will serve as a foundation in international law for students who never plan to take another international law course but also serve as a roadmap of the possibilities for international law study (and careers) for students who want to do more with international law. The course begins with private, cross-border contracting, then moves on to public international law agreements as well. We start with conflict of law rules as well as international treaties designed to coordinate contract law (CISG). From there we dive into the world of private international arbitration, including questions of when state should not permit international arbitration. The course will also covers torts claims, particularly under the Alien Torts Claims Act. We will examine the Bhopal litigation before moving on to some of the cases that have been brought against major oil companies by citizens of developing countries. At that point, the course pivots towards more public law issues that govern international transactions. We look at the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act as well as the OCED Anti-bribery Convention. Finally, we turn to the major treaty regimes on economic subjects, including multilateral trade agreements and the network of bilateral investment treaties.

GRADING: Grades are based on an exam.

738

Financial Law and Regulation: Practitioner's Perspective 2
  • JD elective
  • IntlLLM/SJD/EXC elective
  • IntlLLM Business Cert
  1. Spring 18
  2. Spring 19
  3. Spring 20
  • Reflective Writing
  • Class participation

Every aspect of financial law and regulation depends heavily on its daily practice.  The environment changes all the time, and the scope of regulatory discretion, at every level of government (state, federal and international) is so large that successful practitioners must understand the current trends in regulatory thinking and practice.  This course will allow students to dive deep into a different aspect of modern financial regulation every week by bringing in prominent alumni practitioners who are experts in specific areas of the field.

The course will be structured as follows:

  1. Six 4 hour components, focusing on specific aspects of financial practice according to the expertise of the teacher. Lee Reiners will hold an opening 2 hour class session.
  2. Taught by a series of expert practitioners, who will spend two days at the school. Classes will be held on Thursday and Friday.
  3. The course is a seminar based on a compilation of readings provided during the course.
  4. Students will be graded based upon class participation and six, 1,500-word, writing assignments pertaining to each of the six topics discussed by our guest lecturers.

Likely topics to be covered include:

  • Derivatives regulation
  • High frequency trading
  • FDIC resolution and the insurance fund
  • Volcker Rule and Regulation W
  • Bank capital requirements

 

Class will run from Feb 15th to April 5th and will consist of 13 class sessions that are 2 hours long. Seven class sessions will be on a Friday morning from 9-11am and 6 class sessions will be on Thursday afternoon from 4:00pm to 6:00pm.