555 Law and Financial Anxiety

This course identifies and explores aspects of the American legal system that have effects – both negative and positive – on the ability of people and society to prevent the onset of financial anxiety and economic insecurity.   Set in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic but with analogues in laws that were enacted and implemented in other contexts,  the class will explore the meaning of financial anxiety and economic insecurity and discuss why they matter.  The class will then explore various laws. and their implementation by federal and state agencies, as relevant to financial anxiety and economic insecurity.   Subjects that bear upon financial anxiety that will be explored through the prism of law include housing finance, student loan finance, personal information security and climate security. The legislative response to the COVID-19 pandemic, in particular the CARES Act, will be analyzed in relation to how laws regarding financial anxiety and economic insecurity have been crafted by Congress in the last decade as a response to crises such as the financial and foreclosure crisis of 2008,   With these comparative laws and financial contexts, the class will engage in discussions about the extent to which the American legal system is equipped to handle the challenges of dealing with financial anxiety in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.  We will discuss financial anxiety in the larger context of consumer debt, agency and regulatory action, and legislative responsiveness as well as differential impacts related to debt, race and gender. The readings will come from law and non-law sources. The class will discuss issues relevant to the legal system and the study of business law and finance generally, including the use of data to illuminate legal problems, the role of lawyers and business actors, and the nature of modern policymaking.

Course Areas of Practice
Evaluation Methods
Reflective Writing
Research paper option, 25+ pages
Research and/or analytical paper(s), 15-20 pages
Oral presentation
Class participation
Course Type
Seminar
Learning Outcomes
Knowledge and understanding of substantive and procedural law
2020
Fall 2020
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

555.01 2
  • Reflective Writing
  • Research paper option, 25+ pages
  • Research and/or analytical paper(s), 15-20 pages
  • Oral presentation
  • Class participation
Sarah Bloom Raskin M 4:00 PM-5:50 PM

This course identifies and explores areas of the American legal system that have effects – both negative and positive – on the ability of people and society to prevent the onset of economic insecurity.   The class first will explore the meaning of economic insecurity and discuss why it matters. We will define the onset of such economic insecurity as financial anxiety.  The class will then explore various areas of the law as relevant to financial anxiety (or the onset of such economic insecurity). Areas of our financial system that will be explored through the prism of law include housing finance, student loan finance and information security. The lessons learned regarding the intersections of law to each of these areas of finance will be drawn from the economic context existing in the United States today and in the last decade, including the financial crisis of 2007 and 2008 as well as the cyber-attacks and other ways in which personal financial data is under assault from poor information security systems.  We will discuss each of these issues in the larger context of consumer debt, agency and regulatory action, and legislative responsiveness as well as differential impacts related to debt, race and gender. The readings will come from law and non-law sources. The class will discuss issues relevant to the legal system and the study of business law and finance generally, including the use of data to illuminate legal problems, the role of lawyer and business actors, and the nature of modern policymaking.

 

Grading Basis: Graded

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2016
Spring 2016
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

555.01 3 Linda Malone TuTh 1:45-3:05 PM 3000

This course provides a general introduction to international environmental law and policy. We will begin by exploring the economic, political, and legal concepts relevant to international environmental treaty regimes. We will then apply these concepts to concrete regimes designed to deal with specific international environmental problems, such as transboundary air pollution, atmospheric pollution, marine pollution, fisheries depletion, and biodiversity and habitat loss. The course focuses principally on the dynamic of treaties, negotiations, and state and non-state actors on the international plane, and much less on domestic legislation.

Grades will be awarded on the basis of class participation and a final paper. 

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

*Please note that this information is for planning purposes only, and should not be relied upon for the schedule for a given semester. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.