295 Trusts and Estates

An examination of noncommercial property dispositions, both testamentary and inter vivos, including the following topics: intestate succession; wills and will substitutes; creation and characteristics of trusts; powers of appointment; problems in trust and estate administration.

Course Areas of Practice
Course Type
Lecture
Learning Outcomes
Knowledge and understanding of substantive and procedural law
2020
Spring 2020
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

295.01 3
  • Final Exam
  • Class participation
Doriane Lambelet Coleman MW 10:55AM - 12:20PM 4042

An examination of noncommercial property dispositions, both testamentary and inter vivos, including the following topics: intestate succession; wills and will substitutes; creation and characteristics of trusts; powers of appointment; problems in trust and estate administration.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2019
Spring 2019
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

295.01 3
  • Final Exam
  • Class participation
Doriane Lambelet Coleman M/W 10:55-12:20 PM 3041

The course I’ve planned for spring 2019 is designed to meet two objectives: The first is to ensure that students learn the doctrine so that they are prepared for the trusts and estates sections of the bar examination and for law practice in this and related areas.  The second is to explore the theoretical foundations and policy implications of the various rule choices reflected in that doctrine.  Students will sign up in advance for a day to be responsible for presenting and explaining the doctrine, and open class discussion on doctrine, policy, and theory will proceed on the basis of that foundation.  The textbook for the course is the 10th edition of Sitkoff & Dukeminier’s Wills, Trusts, and Estates.  This will be the first time I’ve taught out of this text and this new edition.  Because of this, there is no past syllabus to provide for students’ review.  But to ensure complete coverage of the subject matter, we will go through the entire book, which translates to about 35-40 pages of reading per class meeting.  The book is well-known for its thoroughness but also for its unusually engaging layout and so I anticipate we’ll get a lot out of it and enjoy the process.  Students will be graded on their class presentation and participation, and on a final take-home exam.

Degree Requirements
Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2018
Spring 2018
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

295.02 3
  • Final Exam
  • Class participation
Curtis A. Twiddy Tu/Th 2:00-3:25 PM 3041

An examination of noncommercial property dispositions, both testamentary and inter vivos, including the following topics: intestate succession; wills and will substitutes; creation and characteristics of trusts; powers of appointment; problems in trust and estate administration.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2017
Fall 2017
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

295.02 3
  • Take-home examination
  • Class participation
Doriane Lambelet Coleman TuTh 2:00-3:25 PM 4000

In Fall 2017, Professor Doriane Coleman will teach the course out of the third edition of Raymond C. O’Brien and Michael T. Flannery, Decedents’ Estates: Cases and Materials (2016).  The book takes a modern approach to family forms and to the distribution of assets, featuring traditional and nontraditional families and inter vivos transfers.  The subjects covered will generally track its table of contents which is available at http://www.cap-press.com/pdf/9781611638653.pdf.  These include intestate succession, the last will and testament, restraints on wealth transfers, future interests, and trusts.  The book is available in hardcover and as an e-book.  The specific goals for the course are to ensure that students are prepared for the testing of these subjects on the bar and have a sophisticated understanding of the foundations and implications of various rule choices.  More generally, because the material features skills and ideas that transcend the particular subject matter – for example, statutory interpretation, the relationship between courts and the legislature, and the division between law and equity – the course is also designed to continue students’ intellectual and professional development in these areas.  Grades will be based on class participation and a final take-home (8-hour business day) exam.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
Spring 2017
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

295.02 3
  • Take-home examination
Curtis A. Twiddy M/W M 2:00-3:20 PM/ W 1:45-3:05 PM 4045

An examination of noncommercial property dispositions, both testamentary and inter vivos, including the following topics: intestate succession; wills and will substitutes; creation and characteristics of trusts; powers of appointment; problems in trust and estate administration.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
2016
Fall 2016
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

295.01 3
  • Scheduled in-class examination
Curtis A. Twiddy TuTH 1:45-3:06PM 4045

An examination of noncommercial property dispositions, both testamentary and inter vivos, including the following topics: intestate succession; wills and will substitutes; creation and characteristics of trusts; powers of appointment; problems in trust and estate administration.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None
Spring 2016
Course Number Course Credits Evaluation Method Instructor Meeting Day/Times Room

295.01 3 Curtis A. Twiddy MW 11:00-12:20 PM 4045

An examination of noncommercial property dispositions, both testamentary and inter vivos, including the following topics: intestate succession; wills and will substitutes; creation and characteristics of trusts; powers of appointment; problems in trust and estate administration.

Pre/Co-requisites
None
Enrollment Restrictions
None

*Please note that this information is for planning purposes only, and should not be relied upon for the schedule for a given semester. Faculty leaves and sabbaticals, as well as other curriculum considerations, will sometimes affect when a course may be offered.